Insurance Expert David D. Lorms Featured in Forbes Magazine

March 31st, 2014 → 7:31 pm @ // No Comments


David D. Lorms was recently featured in Forbes as one of America’s PremierExperts, offering helpful tips on health wealth and success.


Houston, Tex. – March **, 2014 – Insurance expert David Lorms, President of Lorms Insurance Services, was recently seen in the March 2014 issue of Forbes magazine with other leading professionals as part of a feature called “America’s PremierExperts® Presents: Forecasts & Strategies For the New Year and Beyond.” In the Forbes feature, David Lorms and other leading experts from various industries were asked for their top tips on “health, wealth and success to help you thrive in the New Year and beyond.”

Here is what David Lorms had to say to the readers of Forbes about this subject:

“With today’s technology, real personal service can be overlooked. Surprise a client with a hand-written note thanking them for their business or observing a special occasion. Call clients by name, look them in the eye and shake their hand. Make them feel important and they will continue to do business with you and introduce their friends to you. And smile!”

David Lorms is a Farmers Insurance Agent in Houston, TX. His prior work included experience in sales and insurance claims giving him a solid background for becoming an Insurance Agent.  He has won numerous awards including the Blue Vase and Toppers Club. David is heavily involved in his community as a member of his Home Owners Association, an Usher at his Church, and donating time and money to several local Elementary, Middle and High Schools. One program he is proud of is his creation of awarding students for perfect attendance with bikes, medals or other items deemed appropriate by the school. David is also involved in the March of Dimes, AIDS Walk, and Cell Phones for Soldiers, a program that collects old cell phones to exchange for minutes for soldiers to use to call their family.

In 2013, David joined noted business development expert, Brian Tracy, and a select group of the world’s leading business professionals to co-write the book titled, Change Agents: The World’s Leading Experts Reveal Their Secrets for Successfully Changing the Status Quo to Help Their Clients Lead Better Lives and Run Better Businesses. On the day of release, Change Agents reached best-seller status in seven Amazon.com categories – reaching as high as #2 in the “Direct Marketing” and “Marketing for Small Business” categories.

Learn more about David Lorms at http://www.lormsinsuranceservices.com

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Insurance Expert David D. Lorms Featured in Forbes Magazine

March 31st, 2014 → 7:31 pm @ // No Comments


David D. Lorms was recently featured in Forbes as one of America’s PremierExperts, offering helpful tips on health wealth and success.


Houston, Tex. – March **, 2014 – Insurance expert David Lorms, President of Lorms Insurance Services, was recently seen in the March 2014 issue of Forbes magazine with other leading professionals as part of a feature called “America’s PremierExperts® Presents: Forecasts & Strategies For the New Year and Beyond.” In the Forbes feature, David Lorms and other leading experts from various industries were asked for their top tips on “health, wealth and success to help you thrive in the New Year and beyond.”

Here is what David Lorms had to say to the readers of Forbes about this subject:

“With today’s technology, real personal service can be overlooked. Surprise a client with a hand-written note thanking them for their business or observing a special occasion. Call clients by name, look them in the eye and shake their hand. Make them feel important and they will continue to do business with you and introduce their friends to you. And smile!”

David Lorms is a Farmers Insurance Agent in Houston, TX. His prior work included experience in sales and insurance claims giving him a solid background for becoming an Insurance Agent.  He has won numerous awards including the Blue Vase and Toppers Club. David is heavily involved in his community as a member of his Home Owners Association, an Usher at his Church, and donating time and money to several local Elementary, Middle and High Schools. One program he is proud of is his creation of awarding students for perfect attendance with bikes, medals or other items deemed appropriate by the school. David is also involved in the March of Dimes, AIDS Walk, and Cell Phones for Soldiers, a program that collects old cell phones to exchange for minutes for soldiers to use to call their family.

In 2013, David joined noted business development expert, Brian Tracy, and a select group of the world’s leading business professionals to co-write the book titled, Change Agents: The World’s Leading Experts Reveal Their Secrets for Successfully Changing the Status Quo to Help Their Clients Lead Better Lives and Run Better Businesses. On the day of release, Change Agents reached best-seller status in seven Amazon.com categories – reaching as high as #2 in the “Direct Marketing” and “Marketing for Small Business” categories.

Learn more about David Lorms at http://www.lormsinsuranceservices.com

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Is Flood Premium Relief Coming Your Way?

March 20th, 2014 → 6:49 pm @ // No Comments

President Barack Obama is set to sign into law a bipartisan bill relieving homeowners living in flood-prone neighborhoods from big increases in their insurance bills.

The legislation, which cleared Congress on Thursday, reverses much of a 2012 overhaul of the government’s much-criticized flood insurance program after angry homeowners facing sharp premium hikes protested.
The Senate’s 72-22 vote sent the House-drafted measure to Obama. White House officials said he’ll sign it.
The bill would scale back big flood insurance premium increases faced by hundreds of thousands of homeowners. The measure also would allow below-market insurance rates to be passed on to people buying homes in flood zones with taxpayer-subsidized policies.

Critics say Washington is caving to political pressure to undo one of the few recent overhauls it has managed to pass.

“While politically expedient today, this abdication of responsibility by Congress is going to come back and bite them and taxpayers when the next disaster strikes,” said Steve Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, a Washington-based watchdog group. “Everyone knows this program is not fiscally sound or even viable in the near term.”

The hard-fought 2012 rewrite of the federal flood insurance program was aimed at weaning hundreds of thousands of homeowners off of subsidized rates and required extensive updating of the flood maps used to set premiums. But its implementation stirred anxiety among many homeowners along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and in flood plains, many of whom are threatened with unaffordable rate increases.

The legislation offers its greatest relief to owners of properties that were originally built to code but subsequently were found to be at greater flood risk. Such “grandfathered” homeowners currently benefit from below-market rates that are subsidized by other policyholders, and the new legislation would preserve that status and cap premium increases at 18 percent a year. The 2012 overhaul required premiums to increase to actuarially sound rates over five years and required extensive remapping.

Many homeowners faulted the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s implementation of the 2012 law. In some instances, homeowners from areas that had never been flooded were shocked and frightened by warnings of huge, unaffordable premium increases. The resulting uproar quickly got the attention of lawmakers and peppered them with complaints.

“In many cases, these are people with $100,000 homes that are getting (flood insurance) bills that are more than their mortgage payments,” said Rep. John Fleming, R-La. “You had certainly a significant number of people who were really going to be hurt seriously through no fault of their own.”
The top leaders of both parties came on board, overcoming resistance from defenders of the 2012 overhaul like House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, whose turf was trampled along the way.
“Members on both sides of the aisle and a broad geographic distribution got involved. And when you get enough members involved, it’s going to get the attention of the leadership, and that was a major factor,” said Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La.

Another provision, eagerly sought by the real estate industry, would allow sellers of older homes built before original flood insurance risk maps were drafted to pass taxpayer-subsidized policies on to the people buying their homes instead of requiring purchasers to pay actuarially sound rates immediately, as required by the 2012 law. The new rates are particularly high in older coastal communities in states like Florida, Massachusetts and New Jersey, and have put a damper on home sales as prospective buyers recoil at the higher, multifold premium increases.
The measure also would give relief to people who bought homes after the changes were enacted in July 2012 and therefore faced sharp, immediate jumps in their premiums; they would see those increases rolled back and receive rebates. Separate legislation by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, would make sure that rebates would not go to recent buyers of beach houses and other second homes. It passed the Senate Thursday and is likely to get a vote in the House.

“While it is important to put this program on sound financial footing, middle-class families should be able to afford the insurance they need to stay in their homes,” White House spokesman Bobby Whithorne said.
Thursday’s bill was written by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., and Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., with input from Democrats like Rep. Maxine Waters of California, whose votes were critical to House passage last week.

“We’ve solved a very short-term problem and made it a long-term problem,” said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla. “We didn’t really do our work because we were in such a hurry to take the political pressure off of the increases in the flood insurance rates.”

People whose second home is in a flood zone and those whose properties have flooded repeatedly would continue to see their premiums go up by 25 percent a year until reaching a level consistent with their real risk of flooding.

Blog

Is Flood Premium Relief Coming Your Way?

March 20th, 2014 → 6:49 pm @ // No Comments

President Barack Obama is set to sign into law a bipartisan bill relieving homeowners living in flood-prone neighborhoods from big increases in their insurance bills.

The legislation, which cleared Congress on Thursday, reverses much of a 2012 overhaul of the government’s much-criticized flood insurance program after angry homeowners facing sharp premium hikes protested.
The Senate’s 72-22 vote sent the House-drafted measure to Obama. White House officials said he’ll sign it.
The bill would scale back big flood insurance premium increases faced by hundreds of thousands of homeowners. The measure also would allow below-market insurance rates to be passed on to people buying homes in flood zones with taxpayer-subsidized policies.

Critics say Washington is caving to political pressure to undo one of the few recent overhauls it has managed to pass.

“While politically expedient today, this abdication of responsibility by Congress is going to come back and bite them and taxpayers when the next disaster strikes,” said Steve Ellis, vice president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, a Washington-based watchdog group. “Everyone knows this program is not fiscally sound or even viable in the near term.”

The hard-fought 2012 rewrite of the federal flood insurance program was aimed at weaning hundreds of thousands of homeowners off of subsidized rates and required extensive updating of the flood maps used to set premiums. But its implementation stirred anxiety among many homeowners along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and in flood plains, many of whom are threatened with unaffordable rate increases.

The legislation offers its greatest relief to owners of properties that were originally built to code but subsequently were found to be at greater flood risk. Such “grandfathered” homeowners currently benefit from below-market rates that are subsidized by other policyholders, and the new legislation would preserve that status and cap premium increases at 18 percent a year. The 2012 overhaul required premiums to increase to actuarially sound rates over five years and required extensive remapping.

Many homeowners faulted the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s implementation of the 2012 law. In some instances, homeowners from areas that had never been flooded were shocked and frightened by warnings of huge, unaffordable premium increases. The resulting uproar quickly got the attention of lawmakers and peppered them with complaints.

“In many cases, these are people with $100,000 homes that are getting (flood insurance) bills that are more than their mortgage payments,” said Rep. John Fleming, R-La. “You had certainly a significant number of people who were really going to be hurt seriously through no fault of their own.”
The top leaders of both parties came on board, overcoming resistance from defenders of the 2012 overhaul like House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, whose turf was trampled along the way.
“Members on both sides of the aisle and a broad geographic distribution got involved. And when you get enough members involved, it’s going to get the attention of the leadership, and that was a major factor,” said Rep. Charles Boustany, R-La.

Another provision, eagerly sought by the real estate industry, would allow sellers of older homes built before original flood insurance risk maps were drafted to pass taxpayer-subsidized policies on to the people buying their homes instead of requiring purchasers to pay actuarially sound rates immediately, as required by the 2012 law. The new rates are particularly high in older coastal communities in states like Florida, Massachusetts and New Jersey, and have put a damper on home sales as prospective buyers recoil at the higher, multifold premium increases.
The measure also would give relief to people who bought homes after the changes were enacted in July 2012 and therefore faced sharp, immediate jumps in their premiums; they would see those increases rolled back and receive rebates. Separate legislation by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, would make sure that rebates would not go to recent buyers of beach houses and other second homes. It passed the Senate Thursday and is likely to get a vote in the House.

“While it is important to put this program on sound financial footing, middle-class families should be able to afford the insurance they need to stay in their homes,” White House spokesman Bobby Whithorne said.
Thursday’s bill was written by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., and Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., with input from Democrats like Rep. Maxine Waters of California, whose votes were critical to House passage last week.

“We’ve solved a very short-term problem and made it a long-term problem,” said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla. “We didn’t really do our work because we were in such a hurry to take the political pressure off of the increases in the flood insurance rates.”

People whose second home is in a flood zone and those whose properties have flooded repeatedly would continue to see their premiums go up by 25 percent a year until reaching a level consistent with their real risk of flooding.

Blog

The Oaks Business Association

March 12th, 2014 → 8:20 pm @ // No Comments

Oak Forest – On Tuesday, March 11th, 2014, the first general meeting was held for The Oaks Business Association at the St. James Lutheran Church with close to 50 people attending. Topics included the creation and nomination of Board Members to be elect…

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The Oaks Business Association

March 12th, 2014 → 8:20 pm @ // No Comments

Oak Forest – On Tuesday, March 11th, 2014, the first general meeting was held for The Oaks Business Association at the St. James Lutheran Church with close to 50 people attending. Topics included the creation and nomination of Board Members to be elect…

Blog

10 Things to Know about Flood Safety

October 31st, 2013 → 3:55 pm @ // No Comments

Flooding can occur as streams and rivers overflow their banks, when dams or levees break, with run-off from deep snow cover, or any time there is rainfall with significant duration and intensity.

Keep these facts in mind to stay alive and dry.
1. Flash floods can come suddenly. They can occur within a few minutes or hours of heavy rainfall, or when a dam or levee fails and even a sudden release of water held by a debris jam. Be cautious during storms, or any time that flooding is common
2. Drive slowly as you may not have warning that a flash flood is approaching.
3. Stay home and don’t drive unless necessary.
4. Do not drive through flooded areas. If you see a flooded road, turn around and find another route.
5. If there is no other travel route, get to higher ground and wait for the waters to subside.
6. Even if the water looks low enough to cross, don’t attempt it. Water hides wholes in the road. Even worse, there may be no road at all under the water. Flooding can wash away the entire road surface and a large amount of ground beneath.
7. If your car stops running, get out of it immediately and to higher ground.
8. As little as six inches of water can flood the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control and or stalling.
9.One foot of water will float almost many vehicles.
10. As much as two feet of water can wash away most vehicles — including SUVs and trucks.

See more safety tips at FEMA.GOV, NOAA.gov

Blog

10 Things to Know about Flood Safety

October 31st, 2013 → 3:55 pm @ // No Comments

Flooding can occur as streams and rivers overflow their banks, when dams or levees break, with run-off from deep snow cover, or any time there is rainfall with significant duration and intensity.

Keep these facts in mind to stay alive and dry.
1. Flash floods can come suddenly. They can occur within a few minutes or hours of heavy rainfall, or when a dam or levee fails and even a sudden release of water held by a debris jam. Be cautious during storms, or any time that flooding is common
2. Drive slowly as you may not have warning that a flash flood is approaching.
3. Stay home and don’t drive unless necessary.
4. Do not drive through flooded areas. If you see a flooded road, turn around and find another route.
5. If there is no other travel route, get to higher ground and wait for the waters to subside.
6. Even if the water looks low enough to cross, don’t attempt it. Water hides wholes in the road. Even worse, there may be no road at all under the water. Flooding can wash away the entire road surface and a large amount of ground beneath.
7. If your car stops running, get out of it immediately and to higher ground.
8. As little as six inches of water can flood the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control and or stalling.
9.One foot of water will float almost many vehicles.
10. As much as two feet of water can wash away most vehicles — including SUVs and trucks.

See more safety tips at FEMA.GOV, NOAA.gov

Blog

Why do I need Health Insurance?

October 29th, 2013 → 8:05 pm @ // No Comments

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obama Care, for Texas, is a federally run program where the federal Department of Health and Human Services assumes full responsibility for the development and operation of the Health Insurance marketplace. Texas can move to a State Partnership at any time, which works with the Federal Government but Texas could retain the ability to make all key decisions and tailor the marketplace to meet the conditions and needs.

Here are 5 website that can help you with more information:
1. www.HHS.gov
The US Department of Health and Human Services

2. www.healthcare.gov
This is the destination for the Health Insurance Marketplace. The categories are Individuals and Families, Small Businesses and All Topics

Healthcare.gov is close to a one-stop shop for state specific information and links to state Marketplaces. Rates and comparison shopping is reportedly on track to go live October 1, 2013. This site has a 24/7 call center with live operatios, Live Chat and Sign Up so a viewer can register their email address to be notified of breaking news and developments. Design is clean and colorful and easy to read.

3. http://kff.org
he Kaiser Family Foundation is a treasure trove of information on ACA and health care related topics. There are benchmark studies on cost and availability, results of opinion polls showing what different segments of the public thinks about specific features of ACA and perspectives from those who are pro and con ACA.

http://profile.kff.org allows a reader to sign up for a myriad of update options on a variety of health care topics. Twice daily updates are available to coincide with the news cycle as well as email and text alerts to fast breaking stories. Professionally developed presentations, white papers and downloads of studies and laws are readily available and free. The site is easy to navigate.

4. http://www.cms.gov
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is the official website for Medicare and Medicaid and cover over 100 million people. There are strong connections between eligibility for the ACA and Medicaid.

http://cms.gov/about-cms/aca/affordable-care-act-in-action-at-cms.html This section of the CMS site that specifically deals with ACA, Navigators, resources and eligibility.
This website is not quite as user friendly as the other resources listed but the scope of Medicare and Medicaid is enormous. The FAQ and News Release pages are helpful when trying to track down certain topics.

5. http://business.usa.gov/healthcare
This site has a “wizard” that allows a business owner to select a state, input information their business and quickly navigate the maze of regulations pertaining to a business including information links tailored to the size of business. There is a delay of one year for mandated Coverages for business but this calculator tool is something a business could use immediately, if they wished. The simplicity of the calculator masks the depth of information available on this site when you dig down.

Blog

Why do I need Health Insurance?

October 29th, 2013 → 8:05 pm @ // No Comments

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), or Obama Care, for Texas, is a federally run program where the federal Department of Health and Human Services assumes full responsibility for the development and operation of the Health Insurance marketplace. Texas can move to a State Partnership at any time, which works with the Federal Government but Texas could retain the ability to make all key decisions and tailor the marketplace to meet the conditions and needs.

Here are 5 website that can help you with more information:
1. www.HHS.gov
The US Department of Health and Human Services

2. www.healthcare.gov
This is the destination for the Health Insurance Marketplace. The categories are Individuals and Families, Small Businesses and All Topics

Healthcare.gov is close to a one-stop shop for state specific information and links to state Marketplaces. Rates and comparison shopping is reportedly on track to go live October 1, 2013. This site has a 24/7 call center with live operatios, Live Chat and Sign Up so a viewer can register their email address to be notified of breaking news and developments. Design is clean and colorful and easy to read.

3. http://kff.org
he Kaiser Family Foundation is a treasure trove of information on ACA and health care related topics. There are benchmark studies on cost and availability, results of opinion polls showing what different segments of the public thinks about specific features of ACA and perspectives from those who are pro and con ACA.

http://profile.kff.org allows a reader to sign up for a myriad of update options on a variety of health care topics. Twice daily updates are available to coincide with the news cycle as well as email and text alerts to fast breaking stories. Professionally developed presentations, white papers and downloads of studies and laws are readily available and free. The site is easy to navigate.

4. http://www.cms.gov
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is the official website for Medicare and Medicaid and cover over 100 million people. There are strong connections between eligibility for the ACA and Medicaid.

http://cms.gov/about-cms/aca/affordable-care-act-in-action-at-cms.html This section of the CMS site that specifically deals with ACA, Navigators, resources and eligibility.
This website is not quite as user friendly as the other resources listed but the scope of Medicare and Medicaid is enormous. The FAQ and News Release pages are helpful when trying to track down certain topics.

5. http://business.usa.gov/healthcare
This site has a “wizard” that allows a business owner to select a state, input information their business and quickly navigate the maze of regulations pertaining to a business including information links tailored to the size of business. There is a delay of one year for mandated Coverages for business but this calculator tool is something a business could use immediately, if they wished. The simplicity of the calculator masks the depth of information available on this site when you dig down.

Blog